Edmund Scott Miller, composer

musicmiller.com


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“…washed out to sea” – for solo double bass

This work was inspired by an erasure poem I created collaboratively for a class project in April. After thinking about what I wanted to do musically for about a week, I picked up the bass and essentially just improvised. I recorded in one take (well, okay there was a false start that I’m not counting!) and then cut out and discarded large chunks, crafting the final piece. There are no added effects or processing except just a little sprinkling of reverb. This process of recording myself improvising or working out material is entirely new to me. It worked for this piece and it just might be sneaking its way into my process. For now, please enjoy the recording … I need to go and write this down somehow…

“…washed out to sea” was composed, performed, and recorded by Scott A Miller II

Special thanks to Stefan Reichtenstein, an insightful collaborator, gifted photographer, and all-around cool guy for working with me to create the inspiration for this piece. Cheers!


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Organum – for two alto saxophones

Extended program note:

Organum is a composition that borrows its name from the style of medieval sacred music characterized by drones and perfect intervals. However, it is important to note that this piece is not intended to be historical and no stylistic choices were made to align it with the practices of authentic organum. The music is constructed out of two main ideas: a ‘pendulum’ consisting of a chromatic scale fragment swinging down from concert E-flat to concert B-natural and back up, eventually coming to rest in the middle, on a concert D-flat; and a five-note tone row (E-flat – A – B-flat – D-flat) which provides most of the melodic material through a rotational process borrowed from Stravinsky (i.e. “Stravinsky Verticals”). Two similarities are immediately apparent: both musical ideas begin on E-flat and end (eventually) on D-flat, and both contain five different pitches. The second of these becomes the root for the form of the entire piece, the number five playing a significant role in every aspect of the musical development. There is a section of music for each note of the pendulum figure as it unfolds on the macro level. Rhythmic grouping of different numbers (1 through 5) conflict at each transition until 5 has ‘defeated’ 1-4. The pendulum figure only occurs explicitly in the beginning (while the tone row is being presented in retrograde), in the middle (over a D-flat drone, the eventual destination), and at the end (when the destination is finally reached).

An important theme in this piece is the natural versus the artificial. This is embodied respectively in the ‘organic’ pendulum figure versus serial composition techniques as well as the free, meterless flow of the piece versus the exactitude of certain rhythms. 

 

Performed here by the incredible Jacob Swanson and Sarah Marchitelli:


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Artifact – for soprano, recorder, guitar, violin, and viola da gamba

World premier recording by Lisa Perry, Aik Shin Tan, Jeremy Lyons, Mark Erickson, and Niccolo Seligmann. Live at the Walter’s Art Museum in Baltimore. Text by the composer.

 

Timeless turned-over artifact

Personifying masterworks.

Ancient, looking forward,

Back through.

 

Timeless, ancient,

Turned-over looking

Artifact. Forward,

Personifying back through

Masterworks.

 

Ancient, looking forward,

Back through timeless,

Turned-over artifact,

Personifying masterworks.

 

(text by the composer)


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World Premier – ‘Artifact’ at the Walter’s Art Museum

This Friday, 4 October 2013, I’ll be having a composition premiered alongside new works by other Masters students from Peabody Conservatory at the Walter’s Art Museum. My piece is for soprano, recorder, guitar, violin, and bass viola da gamba. This was an interesting project for me for a number of reasons, but at the heart of the matter was that I only had about two and a half weeks to write a 6 minute piece from the ground up. There were also a lot of firsts: writing for viola da gamba, writing for recorder, writing a concert piece for voice and chamber ensemble, not to mention the first thing I was to compose at my new institution.

I had to come up with a concept  immediately, find a text to set (or determine another way to write for the soprano affectively), then experiment with the actual musical material. Having been given the instrumentation and the performance space, I immediately noticed a connection between the plethora of historical pieces in the Walter’s and the pseudo period ensemble. This served very strongly as a source of inspiration conceptually. It made me think about the purpose of these artworks and instruments today; is the interest artistic or historical or both? This was a decent starting point for me and I had to find a text that concerned itself with that.  Well, I didn’t know any, and everyone knows finding a text that is musically motivating can take months if not longer.

In a bizarre coincidence,  I had learned about this opportunity while in Baltimore signing the lease for my new apartment, though I wasn’t moving in for another week and had to drive back to upstate New York. While driving for 6-7 hours I was thinking about what sort of text I wanted. In fact, I got such a good idea of what I was looking for, I actually ended up just writing the text myself! I don’t claim to be any kind of poet, but I like words and writing enough that I felt comfortable, in this case, writing text to be set to music. With the concept settled and and poetry finalized, I could proceed basically unhindered in the composing of the piece. I spent my last week in Albany and my first week in Baltimore at the piano with my head down, pencil in hand, guitar on my lap. The only breaks I had were miniature seminars with the recordist and viola da gamba player who graciously helped me get a sense of their unique instruments. The whole experience was a great exercise in ‘creativity on demand.’ At the end of it all, I feel it’s a strong piece, born of necessity with little time to double back and alter the particulars.